4/3/14
 
 

Slow Fashion

 
 

The average American household has a median annual income of approximately $50,000. If it spends 3% of their income on clothing, they'll have $1,500 a year, or $125 per month to spend. Instead of buying five fast-fashion, low-quality items costing $25 each, they could invest in one or two quality items at a higher price point.”

Keila Tyner, who has a PhD in textiles and clothing, and works as a personal stylist, writes an interesting piece for Quartz on the hidden dangers of fast fashion's rise in the United States. From ethical issues, environmental concerns and questions of quality, there's a lot to think about. "So what should shoppers do when faced with rising costs and the ethical dilemmas of cheap clothing?" she asks. "One option is to reconsider our approach to clothing by taking a cue from Europeans who have historically been more focused on quality rather than quantity."

Read more ›
 

The Man Who Got Rid of Everything

Following a bad break-up, a Finnish man named Petri Luukkainen began his one-year human experiment: live without any material goods—including his clothes.

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Slow Fashion | Valet.
 

4/3/14
 
 

Slow Fashion

 
 

The average American household has a median annual income of approximately $50,000. If it spends 3% of their income on clothing, they'll have $1,500 a year, or $125 per month to spend. Instead of buying five fast-fashion, low-quality items costing $25 each, they could invest in one or two quality items at a higher price point.”

Keila Tyner, who has a PhD in textiles and clothing, and works as a personal stylist, writes an interesting piece for Quartz on the hidden dangers of fast fashion's rise in the United States. From ethical issues, environmental concerns and questions of quality, there's a lot to think about. "So what should shoppers do when faced with rising costs and the ethical dilemmas of cheap clothing?" she asks. "One option is to reconsider our approach to clothing by taking a cue from Europeans who have historically been more focused on quality rather than quantity."

Read more ›
 

The Man Who Got Rid of Everything

Following a bad break-up, a Finnish man named Petri Luukkainen began his one-year human experiment: live without any material goods—including his clothes.

Share:
Save: