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The Best Sneakers for Every Workout

If you're like most guys, you throw on a pair of running shoes and hit the gym for a workout. But what kind of workout are you doing? After all, preparation is the key to success and what you wear on your feet in the gym will definitely impact your performance. Of course, not all gym shoes are created equal. Depending on your workout routine, here are solid options to make you faster, stronger and more coordinated.

Our New Favorite

APL's first training shoe boasts an impressive feature list but we particularly appreciate the numerous lacing options for a custom fit, an external heel counter for support and the brand's long-lasting proprietary Propelium outsole.

$195 at East Dane

For Treadmill Runners

Most treadmill decks already have built-in cushioning, so you don't want any extra in your shoe. Saucony's Kinvara has a light, responsive and flexible feel that makes for easy stabilization. It also breathes well (because you can build up quite a lot of heat in your feet when running inside).

$110 at Saucony

For Intense Workouts

Nike's MetCon 3 has a soft, flexible midsole and firm rubber heel that delivers equal amounts of stability for squats and wall exercises along with cushioning for extra bounce in your jumps. The textured rubber sides are great for rope climbing too.

$130 at Nike

For a Barefoot Feel

Specifically designed for cross-training and conditioning workouts, Inov-8's minimalist Bare-XF has a thin midsole to help ground you during lifts and a wider toe box that allows toes to splay naturally. A grippy sole comes in handy for lunges and sled pushes.

$100 / $89.99 at Zappos

For a Little of Everything

A workout workhorse, this lightweight sneaker is ideal for guys who split their time between cardio machines and weight lifting. It's got the heel-toe support and shock-absorbing sole of a running shoe and the pliability of a cross-trainer thanks to forefoot flex grooves.

$95 / $64 at 361 USA Direct

Swap Your Shoes

Exercisers who used multiple pairs of sneakers for various workouts were 39% less likely to be sidelined by an injury than those who constantly wore just one.

(Source: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports)